========446==================================================

Cane Species

Sun, 17 Aug 2003 22:11:53 -0000

"Jim Roberts" <[email protected]..>



Hello All,

I've been on the list for some time observing from the sidelines.

Is there anyone out there who knows the botanical names of the cane
species that are usable as shafts?

I've seen some stuff on the highway but it doesn't seem strong
enough. I live in the western Chicago Suburbs.

I do get down south to Tennessee as my parents and sister live in the
northeast corner of the state. My mom's a gardener and takes
interest in the botanical names and such. If I can tell her the name
she may be in a position to supply me with some raw material.

As of this writing my only arrowmaking experience has been with
Cedar, Pine and Birch shafts.

Regards,
Jim Roberts
Carol Stream, IL USA

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========447==================================================

Re: [bambooarrow] Cane Species

Mon, 18 Aug 2003 09:16:31 +0100 (BST)

"[email protected]..?=" <[email protected]..>



Hello Jim

Some species I've seen listed/used include
Pseudosasa Japonica (Japanese arrow bamboo)
Pseudosasa Coreans: Korean arrow bamboo

River Reed Phragmites commumus
River cane Arundinaria tecta: southeastern tribes (Get
Primitive Archer Vol 4 Issue 4 if you can)

Latin names vary: the first 2 I listed are often
referred to Arundinaria, which is botanically
incorrect, apparently.

All the best
Hilary Greenland
www.sptradarch.org




________________________________________________________________________
Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo!
Messenger uk.messenger.yahoo.com/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========448==================================================

Re: Cane Species

Mon, 18 Aug 2003 16:40:36 -0000

"Jim Roberts" <[email protected]..>



Thanks Hilary,

Now that I have something to go by.

As for looking in Tennessee my Mom laughed when I had mentioned
giving her the names of the plants. It seems that there's a local
name for just about everything. And from the way she describes it,
it's that just about every county or town has their own name for a
plant.

With the botanical names I can put a picture to each species.

Regards,
Jim Roberts

--- In [email protected], "[email protected].." <[email protected]..>
wrote:
> Hello Jim
>
> Some species I've seen listed/used include
> Pseudosasa Japonica (Japanese arrow bamboo)
> Pseudosasa Coreans: Korean arrow bamboo
>
> River Reed Phragmites commumus
> River cane Arundinaria tecta: southeastern tribes (Get
> Primitive Archer Vol 4 Issue 4 if you can)
>
> Latin names vary: the first 2 I listed are often
> referred to Arundinaria, which is botanically
> incorrect, apparently.
>
> All the best
> Hilary Greenland
> www.sptradarch.org
>
>
>
>
>
______________________________________________________________________
__
> Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE
Yahoo!
> Messenger uk.messenger.yahoo.com/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========449==================================================

Re: [bambooarrow] Re:Jim -Cane Species

Mon, 18 Aug 2003 19:49:33 +0100 (BST)

"[email protected]..?=" <[email protected]..>



Jim
Should be Pseudosasa Coreana, not coreans as I said.
I'm a dyslexic typist...with 5 thumbs per hand
All the best with finding suitable canes.
Hilary

________________________________________________________________________
Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo!
Messenger uk.messenger.yahoo.com/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========450==================================================

Re:Jim -Cane Species

Mon, 18 Aug 2003 20:49:39 -0000

"Jim Roberts" <[email protected]..>



I've been accused of that on more than one occasion.

Thanks!

Jim Roberts

--- In [email protected], "[email protected].." <[email protected]..>
wrote:
> Jim
> Should be Pseudosasa Coreana, not coreans as I said.
> I'm a dyslexic typist...with 5 thumbs per hand
> All the best with finding suitable canes.
> Hilary
>
>
______________________________________________________________________
__
> Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE
Yahoo!
> Messenger uk.messenger.yahoo.com/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========451==================================================

RE: [bambooarrow] Cane Species

Mon, 18 Aug 2003 17:45:27 -0400

"WEden" <[email protected]..>



Arundinaria gigantea/gigantica is the larger species of river cane in the
US. Plants from younger culms (or whatever) are small enough for arrows and
have the advantage of long runs between nodes and smoother, straighter
nodes. It also makes great blowguns, bedsprings, strips for baskets and
mats, etc...

Drop me an email offline and we'll talk about sending you fresh cut green
river cane shafts. They'll need to be harvested in the next few months
though, before fall die-back/dry out.

Wynne Eden
bellsouthpwp.net/s/t/stickbow/


-----Original Message-----
From: [email protected] [mailto :b [email protected]]
Sent: Monday, August 18, 2003 8:03 AM
To: [email protected]
Subject: [bambooarrow] Digest Number 155







------------------------------------------------------------------------

There are 2 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Cane Species
From: "Jim Roberts" <[email protected]..>
2. Re: Cane Species
From: "[email protected].." <[email protected]..>


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 1
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2003 22:11:53 -0000
From: "Jim Roberts" <[email protected]..>
Subject: Cane Species

Hello All,

I've been on the list for some time observing from the sidelines.

Is there anyone out there who knows the botanical names of the cane
species that are usable as shafts?

I've seen some stuff on the highway but it doesn't seem strong
enough. I live in the western Chicago Suburbs.

I do get down south to Tennessee as my parents and sister live in the
northeast corner of the state. My mom's a gardener and takes
interest in the botanical names and such. If I can tell her the name
she may be in a position to supply me with some raw material.

As of this writing my only arrowmaking experience has been with
Cedar, Pine and Birch shafts.

Regards,
Jim Roberts
Carol Stream, IL USA



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 2
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2003 09:16:31 +0100 (BST)
From: "[email protected].." <[email protected]..>
Subject: Re: Cane Species

Hello Jim

Some species I've seen listed/used include
Pseudosasa Japonica (Japanese arrow bamboo)
Pseudosasa Coreans: Korean arrow bamboo

River Reed Phragmites commumus
River cane Arundinaria tecta: southeastern tribes (Get
Primitive Archer Vol 4 Issue 4 if you can)

Latin names vary: the first 2 I listed are often
referred to Arundinaria, which is botanically
incorrect, apparently.

All the best
Hilary Greenland
www.sptradarch.org




________________________________________________________________________
Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo!
Messenger uk.messenger.yahoo.com/


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________





++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========452==================================================

Supply Moso Bamboo seeds

Mon, 18 Aug 2003 23:46:54 -0000

"winmars2003" <[email protected]..>



We are in position to supply Moso(Phyllostachys pubescens) seeds.
Interested please send inquiry to mailbox directly for quick response.
Thanks and regards.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========453==================================================

Re: [bambooarrow] Supply Moso Bamboo seeds

Mon, 18 Aug 2003 22:58:19 -0800

Jim Carter <[email protected]..>



Does anyone know if this stuff makes good arrows?

Jim Carter
Sitka, AK

----- Original Message -----

> We are in position to supply Moso(Phyllostachys pubescens) seeds.
> Interested please send inquiry to mailbox directly for quick response.
> Thanks and regards.
>
>
>

>
>
>
>
>
>
>

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========454==================================================

Re: [bambooarrow] Supply Moso Bamboo seeds

Tue, 19 Aug 2003 09:21:22 +0100 (BST)

"[email protected]..?=" <[email protected]..>



Jim
According to my references, this is the largest grown
bamboo in Japan, and good for sprouting for food.
"Nodes not prominent".
No mention of arrows.
Hilary

________________________________________________________________________
Want to chat instantly with your online friends? Get the FREE Yahoo!
Messenger uk.messenger.yahoo.com/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========455==================================================

New Member

Fri, 19 Sep 2003 07:11:12 -0000

"markinengland1961" <[email protected]..>



Hello, just joined your group. Hope to learn lots.
Mark

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========456==================================================

drying bamboo

Wed, 01 Oct 2003 02:05:03 -0000

"loonie54603" <[email protected]..>



hello folks, a friend of mine is getting bamboo from thailand to
make flutes. The problem is that it's drying too fast and the
bamboo is cracking, could anyone offer suggestions on relitive
humidy and seasonin of the material. Thanks, jack

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========457==================================================

Links to Bamboo Arrow Video

Fri, 31 Oct 2003 00:36:42 -0000

"koreanarchery" <[email protected]..>



I placed links to where the bamboo arrow video can be purchased in
the 'links' section of our discussion group.


Thomas

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========458==================================================

Re: drying bamboo

Fri, 31 Oct 2003 18:04:16 -0000

"jonathanwexler1" <[email protected]..>



OK first off I have never made bamboo arrows.

That said, what about sealing the cut ends with wax? this may slow
the loss of moisture through the cuts.

Another thought is to stabilize them in a more humid environment like
the basement or bathroom.

While bamboo is a grass, and not a wood, I would think drying it
would be a similar proposal, only bamboo may show damage faster.

You might contact a lumber seller who deals in high quality hardwoods
and ask about storage ideas.

I am going to try to speak to a local bamboo guy. If you can get me
species, where it comes from and mode of shipment it will help.

I will try and get a link up.

Jonathan

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========459==================================================

Re: drying bamboo

Fri, 31 Oct 2003 18:23:20 -0000

"jonathanwexler1" <[email protected]..>



I have submitted a request for advice to Troy Susan of Bamboo
Craftsman co. here in my city. This fellow imports Bamboo for
flooring, furniture, garden use....you name it.

I figure he may be able to give us advice on optimal drying
techniques.

Here's the URL to his site to amuse you while we wait for an answer.

www.bamboocraftsman.com/

Thomas, is it ok to post URL's like this?

I also have a URL for a bamboo source in Oregon which while
very...eccentric...might be a source for unusual species. I have yet
to contact him, but this fellow may have access to Korean rather than
Japanese arrow bamboo. Would it be ok to post?

Jonathan

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========460==================================================

Re: Supply Moso Bamboo seeds

Fri, 31 Oct 2003 19:53:13 -0000

"jonathanwexler1" <[email protected]..>



"winmars2003" <[email protected]..> wrote:
> We are in position to supply Moso(Phyllostachys pubescens) seeds.

If you like to eat Chinese food and want to grow your own bamboo
shoots, buy these seeds.

If you want to make arrows, don't

we been spammed.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========461==================================================

apology re: Drying bamboo

Fri, 31 Oct 2003 21:08:49 -0000

"jonathanwexler1" <[email protected]..>



Since the inquiry about drying bamboo wasnt from this board, Maybe i
shouldn't have posted it here...duhhhh.

Sorry folks

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========462==================================================

Re: [bambooarrow] apology re: Drying bamboo

Sun, 02 Nov 2003 02:24:52 -0500

[email protected]..



As a newby on this group I think it is nice to see anything posted! Seems a bit quiet.
Have three Japanese Arrow Bamboos plants growing so hope to be making some arrows in a year or two. Anyone got any hints on what to cut, how to dry, how to judge for spine etc?
Mark in England

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========463==================================================

Re: [bambooarrow] apology re: Drying bamboo

Sun, 2 Nov 2003 00:23:37 -0800

"Jonathan Wexler" <[email protected]..>



Cut when the plants are 3 years old. Cut them from October through December
to reduce cracking.

Those are the only things I have figured out so far. From what I have found
online, those 2 things produce better material and less cracking.
----- Original Message -----
From: <[email protected]..>
To: <[email protected]>
Sent: Saturday, November 01, 2003 11:24 PM
Subject: Re: [bambooarrow] apology re: Drying bamboo


> As a newby on this group I think it is nice to see anything posted! Seems
a bit quiet.
> Have three Japanese Arrow Bamboos plants growing so hope to be making some
arrows in a year or two. Anyone got any hints on what to cut, how to dry,
how to judge for spine etc?
> Mark in England
>
>

>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========464==================================================

re: Drying bamboo

Sun, 2 Nov 2003 10:49:06 -0500

"WEden" <[email protected]..>



I use a lot of river cane, and simply bundle a dozenor so shafts together
and let them dry in the laundry room--the least well-heated, most humid room
in my house. As I cut them rather long (4-1/2 to 5 feet) and cut them near
the nodes, they do fine. It's best to cut them in late summer or fall,
depending on the weather in your area. If it's been a wet summer, wait 'til
fall.

I cut large bamboo for backing or posts or whatever too, and dry it in
pretty much the same way (14' ceilings in my house)

I wouldn't seal the ends like you would with wooden bowstaves. Because the
outer layer of the bamboo is essentially waterproof, you'll have created a
watertight stick, and it will probably never dry.

Wynne Eden
bellsouthpwp.net/s/t/stickbow/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========465==================================================

Re: drying bamboo

Sun, 02 Nov 2003 22:25:26 -0000

"koreanarchery" <[email protected]..>



>
> www.bamboocraftsman.com/
>
> Thomas, is it ok to post URL's like this?
>
> I also have a URL for a bamboo source in Oregon which while
> very...eccentric...might be a source for unusual species. I have
yet
> to contact him, but this fellow may have access to Korean rather
than
> Japanese arrow bamboo. Would it be ok to post?
>
> Jonathan

Sure, Jonathan. Anything that can help people with bamboo arrows is
o.k. to post.


Thomas

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========466==================================================

Bamboo Garden - in Portland Oregon

Mon, 03 Nov 2003 21:56:53 -0000

"jonathanwexler1" <[email protected]..>



This is a private business that sells only Bamboos. They may be
visited by appointment only.

They seem to have exceptional service and selection.

I plan on making a trip, if there are some Northwest folks out there
interested, let me know and we can arrange a field trip.

www.bamboogarden.com

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========467==================================================

Possible source for Korean Bamboo!

Tue, 04 Nov 2003 16:22:25 -0000

"jonathanwexler1" <[email protected]..>



I have been communicating with the Bamboo Garden. This morning I
received this:

I did some searching on the internet and found the following page..

gmr.landfood.unimelb.edu..../Sasa.html

Where you can see that at least some botanists consider Sasa coreana
the same as Sasa kurilensis see.. Sasa coreana Nakai

We do have 2 different forms of Sasa kurilensis neither is as tall as
Ps japonica, but the stems are stronger, with a smaller fistula
(central hole.)

Ned Jaquith
Portland Oregon
[email protected]..
www.bamboogarden.com/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========468==================================================

Re: Possible source for Korean Bamboo!

Wed, 05 Nov 2003 13:36:58 -0000

"koreanarchery" <[email protected]..>



Unfortunately, Jonathan, kurilensis and coreana are not the same,
though they are similar (japonica is in the same grouping, too).
The page you referred to was one that I helped the author with
Korean translation of plant names. Even though I showed him that
kurilensis and coreana were not the same, he insisted they were and
kept it that way.

In Korean, kurilensis is called "s¨¯m jolit dae" and coreana is "shin
ee dae," so you can see Koreans differentiate the two. Still, it
never hurts to try--you might find another good arrow bamboo!


Thomas




--- In [email protected], "jonathanwexler1"
<[email protected]..> wrote:
> I have been communicating with the Bamboo Garden. This morning I
> received this:
>
> I did some searching on the internet and found the following page..
>
> gmr.landfood.unimelb.edu..../Sasa.html
>
> Where you can see that at least some botanists consider Sasa
coreana
> the same as Sasa kurilensis see.. Sasa coreana Nakai
>
> We do have 2 different forms of Sasa kurilensis neither is as tall
as
> Ps japonica, but the stems are stronger, with a smaller fistula
> (central hole.)
>
> Ned Jaquith
> Portland Oregon
> [email protected]..
> www.bamboogarden.com/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========469==================================================

Archery Site

Thu, 06 Nov 2003 14:08:05 -0000

"s3r3al" <[email protected]..>



This goes to all the fellow "DIY"
www3.sympatico.ca/ragiwar...y/diy.html

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========470==================================================

Korean Bamboo Arrow Nocks

Thu, 11 Dec 2003 23:15:25 -0000

"koreanarchery" <[email protected]..>



The board has been rather quiet lately, so I thought I'd post a
little note.

Korean bamboo arrow nocks are made from the wood called "ssari namu"
in Korean. The common name in English is "bush clover," while the
scientific name is "Lespedeza bicolor Turcz."

According to my fletcher friend, historically, the shoot-like wood
was used to make nails. He demonstrated its strength for me by
taking a blank nock and driving it into a 2x4 with one blow from a
hammer. I have rarely seen a split or broken nock made from this
type of wood.

I will put a picture in the photos section of the bush clover's
flowers and leaves.


Thomas

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========471==================================================

Re: [bambooarrow] Korean Bamboo Arrow Nocks

Thu, 11 Dec 2003 19:34:30 -0600

"Alastair" <[email protected]..>



Sounds cool, wonder if it grows wild in the USA?-Alastair
----- Original Message -----
From: "koreanarchery" <[email protected]..>
To: <[email protected]>
Sent: Thursday, December 11, 2003 5:15 PM
Subject: [bambooarrow] Korean Bamboo Arrow Nocks


> The board has been rather quiet lately, so I thought I'd post a
> little note.
>
> Korean bamboo arrow nocks are made from the wood called "ssari namu"
> in Korean. The common name in English is "bush clover," while the
> scientific name is "Lespedeza bicolor Turcz."
>
> According to my fletcher friend, historically, the shoot-like wood
> was used to make nails. He demonstrated its strength for me by
> taking a blank nock and driving it into a 2x4 with one blow from a
> hammer. I have rarely seen a split or broken nock made from this
> type of wood.
>
> I will put a picture in the photos section of the bush clover's
> flowers and leaves.
>
>
> Thomas
>
>
>
>
>
>

>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========473==================================================

Re: Possible source for Korean Bamboo!

Sat, 13 Dec 2003 06:49:09 -0000

"firebass4" <[email protected]..>



--I aquired some bamboo that I thought was arrow bamboo. The nodes
are 12" or more apart, but older shoots have sprouts that seem to be
detrimental to the making of arrows. They get as large as about 1" in
diamiter but when pruned seem to remain arrow width. I live in South-
East Texas. They are not especially straight, but heat treating them
seems to work, although they are still green. Should I wait until
they have dried?

- In [email protected], "koreanarchery" <[email protected]..>
wrote:
> Unfortunately, Jonathan, kurilensis and coreana are not the same,
> though they are similar (japonica is in the same grouping, too).
> The page you referred to was one that I helped the author with
> Korean translation of plant names. Even though I showed him that
> kurilensis and coreana were not the same, he insisted they were and
> kept it that way.
>
> In Korean, kurilensis is called "s¨¯m jolit dae" and coreana
is "shin
> ee dae," so you can see Koreans differentiate the two. Still, it
> never hurts to try--you might find another good arrow bamboo!
>
>
> Thomas
>
>
>
>
> --- In [email protected], "jonathanwexler1"
> <[email protected]..> wrote:
> > I have been communicating with the Bamboo Garden. This morning I
> > received this:
> >
> > I did some searching on the internet and found the following
page..
> >
> > gmr.landfood.unimelb.edu..../Sasa.html
> >
> > Where you can see that at least some botanists consider Sasa
> coreana
> > the same as Sasa kurilensis see.. Sasa coreana Nakai
> >
> > We do have 2 different forms of Sasa kurilensis neither is as
tall
> as
> > Ps japonica, but the stems are stronger, with a smaller fistula
> > (central hole.)
> >
> > Ned Jaquith
> > Portland Oregon
> > [email protected]..
> > www.bamboogarden.com/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========474==================================================

Re: [bambooarrow] Re: Possible source for Korean Bamboo!

Sat, 13 Dec 2003 11:18:35 -0500

"mark" <[email protected]..>



Thomas
i just bought some of the bamboo arrows from 3 rivers do you make those ? if
no , have you ever shot them ?
i also purchased the Korean bow & arrow videos . yours too ?
im just waiting for it all to come in .


----- Original Message -----
From: "firebass4" <[email protected]..>
To: <[email protected]>
Sent: Saturday, December 13, 2003 1:49 AM
Subject: [bambooarrow] Re: Possible source for Korean Bamboo!


> --I aquired some bamboo that I thought was arrow bamboo. The nodes
> are 12" or more apart, but older shoots have sprouts that seem to be
> detrimental to the making of arrows. They get as large as about 1" in
> diamiter but when pruned seem to remain arrow width. I live in South-
> East Texas. They are not especially straight, but heat treating them
> seems to work, although they are still green. Should I wait until
> they have dried?
>
> - In [email protected], "koreanarchery" <[email protected]..>
> wrote:
> > Unfortunately, Jonathan, kurilensis and coreana are not the same,
> > though they are similar (japonica is in the same grouping, too).
> > The page you referred to was one that I helped the author with
> > Korean translation of plant names. Even though I showed him that
> > kurilensis and coreana were not the same, he insisted they were and
> > kept it that way.
> >
> > In Korean, kurilensis is called "s¨¯m jolit dae" and coreana
> is "shin
> > ee dae," so you can see Koreans differentiate the two. Still, it
> > never hurts to try--you might find another good arrow bamboo!
> >
> >
> > Thomas
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > --- In [email protected], "jonathanwexler1"
> > <[email protected]..> wrote:
> > > I have been communicating with the Bamboo Garden. This morning I
> > > received this:
> > >
> > > I did some searching on the internet and found the following
> page..
> > >
> > > gmr.landfood.unimelb.edu..../Sasa.html
> > >
> > > Where you can see that at least some botanists consider Sasa
> > coreana
> > > the same as Sasa kurilensis see.. Sasa coreana Nakai
> > >
> > > We do have 2 different forms of Sasa kurilensis neither is as
> tall
> > as
> > > Ps japonica, but the stems are stronger, with a smaller fistula
> > > (central hole.)
> > >
> > > Ned Jaquith
> > > Portland Oregon
> > > [email protected]..
> > > www.bamboogarden.com/
>
>
>

>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========475==================================================

Re: [bambooarrow] Korean Bamboo Arrow Nocks

Sat, 13 Dec 2003 17:05:48 +0000 (GMT)

"[email protected]..?=" <[email protected]..>



Hello Thomas

Thanks for the Bush clover info.

I shall be looking to get one to add to my garden of
toxological plants...

Hilary
www.sptradarch.org

________________________________________________________________________
BT Yahoo! Broadband - Save £80 when you order online today. Hurry! Offer ends 21st December 2003. The way the internet was meant to be. uk.rd.yahoo.com/evt=21064...ahoo.co.uk

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========476==================================================

Re: [bambooarrow] Bush clover: all round good plant

Sat, 13 Dec 2003 17:46:59 +0000 (GMT)

"[email protected]..?=" <[email protected]..>



Hello Thomas
Just a short note (again) about bush clover: my
researches say it's young leaves, stems and flowers
are all edible when cooked, and leaves are used as a
tea substitute, and for medicinal purposes (don't know
what for yet). It is interesting theat many plants
used for weapons which kill, can also be used to
heal...
Hilary
(PS attracts bees, too!)

________________________________________________________________________
BT Yahoo! Broadband - Save £80 when you order online today. Hurry! Offer ends 21st December 2003. The way the internet was meant to be. uk.rd.yahoo.com/evt=21064...ahoo.co.uk

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========477==================================================

subscription

Tue, 16 Dec 2003 02:54:55 -0500

"Sim Jones" <[email protected]..>



thanks

Sim





++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========478==================================================

Questions for Interview

Fri, 13 Feb 2004 08:26:21 -0000

"koreanarchery" <[email protected]..>



I asked a similar thing before, a few years ago, and received some
really great questions. Unfortunately, my computer and drives have
been exchanged many times since, and I can't locate the questions.

I will be spending this year researching, translating, interviewing,
etc. towards writing my book on Korean traditional archery. Because
I am so close to the subject, many questions I might overlook. For
that reason, I need your help. Please ask any questions you might
have regarding the areas below (and what you would ask if you were
interviewing experts in the associated areas) and send them to me at
[email protected].. Thanks! Your help will be very valuable.

Here are the major areas I will be covering (also, let me know if
there is an area you think I should cover that isn't listed):

I.        History

II.        Equipment
A.        Bows
B.        Arrows
C.        Thumb Rings
D.        Arrow Cases
E.        Miscellaneous

III.        Techniques
A.        Stance
B.        Gripping the Bow
C.        Positioning the Arrow
D.        Drawing the String
E.        Aiming
F.        Releasing
G.        Correcting Errors

IV.        Archery Grounds
A.        Club House
B.        Shooting Line
C.        Ch&#335;ng Kan
D.        Targets
E.        Arrow Return Device
F.        Tethered Arrow

V.        Competition
A.        Intra-club
1.        P'y&#335;nsa
2.        Sangsa
B.        Inter-city
C.        Provincial
D.        National
E.        Ranking

VI.        Philosophy and Ceremony
A.        Precepts
B.        Training Directives
C.        Ceremonies

VII.        Regulations of the Korea Traditional Archery Association

VIII.        Korean Archery Terminology Glossary

IX.        Conclusion

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========479==================================================

Hi from Austria!

Mon, 16 Feb 2004 18:07:43 -0000

"guiltyrazors" <[email protected]..>



Hello bamboo and river cane lovers!
I´m glad to join this nice group with lots of informations.
I have done some bamboo and river cane arrows the last 4 years and
will post some of them in the files section soon.

So far I have worked with Martha Steward tomato stakes,chinese bamboo,
tonkin bamboo and some river cane.

charly

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========480==================================================

Re: [bambooarrow] Hi from Austria!

Mon, 16 Feb 2004 11:10:31 -0800 (PST)

[email protected]..



> Hello bamboo and river cane lovers!
> I´m glad to join this nice group with lots of informations.
> I have done some bamboo and river cane arrows the last 4 years and will
> post some of them in the files section soon.
>
> So far I have worked with Martha Steward tomato stakes,chinese bamboo,
> tonkin bamboo and some river cane.
>
> charly

Hi Charly,
Welcome to the list! Looking forward to your posts. Are you making a
traditional style of arrow or what?

David/Biaseka

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========481==================================================

Re: Hi from Austria!

Fri, 20 Feb 2004 02:06:44 -0000

"guiltyrazors" <[email protected]..>



Hi David/Biaseka

here are some pics from my photopage from my works with japanese and
chinese bamboo,river cane and tonkin cane:

community.webshots.com/ph...2430YolANQ
community.webshots.com/ph...5739dhOZGO
both pics show a japanese bamboo arrow with osage foreshaft and maple
nock,grey goose feathers.

community.webshots.com/ph...9346LqCtaz
community.webshots.com/ph...9653WbtAgO
two pics of tonkin cane arrows with osage foreshaft and osage nock,
wild turkey feathers

community.webshots.com/ph...0505zPhZyN
Rivercane arrow with osage foreshaft

community.webshots.com/ph...4676gwDkwx
community.webshots.com/ph...1064DulpWU
community.webshots.com/ph...1641wNltLk
3 pics of chinese bamboo arrows with sinew wrapped wild turkey
feathers,horn nocks,one pic with osage foreshafts and steel field
points


hope you like my works...
yours
charly



>
> Hi Charly,
> Welcome to the list! Looking forward to your posts. Are you
making a
> traditional style of arrow or what?
>
> David/Biaseka

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========482==================================================

Re: [bambooarrow] Re: Hi from Austria!

Fri, 20 Feb 2004 17:31:26 -0800 (PST)

[email protected]..



> Hi David/Biaseka
>
> here are some pics from my photopage from my works with japanese and
> chinese bamboo,river cane and tonkin cane:
>
> community.webshots.com/ph...2430YolANQ
> community.webshots.com/ph...5739dhOZGO
> both pics show a japanese bamboo arrow with osage foreshaft and maple
> nock,grey goose feathers.
>
> community.webshots.com/ph...9346LqCtaz
> community.webshots.com/ph...9653WbtAgO
> two pics of tonkin cane arrows with osage foreshaft and osage nock, wild
> turkey feathers
>
> community.webshots.com/ph...0505zPhZyN
> Rivercane arrow with osage foreshaft
>
> community.webshots.com/ph...4676gwDkwx
> community.webshots.com/ph...1064DulpWU
> community.webshots.com/ph...1641wNltLk
> 3 pics of chinese bamboo arrows with sinew wrapped wild turkey
> feathers,horn nocks,one pic with osage foreshafts and steel field
> points
>
>
> hope you like my works...
> yours
> charly

Hi Charly,

I viewed your arrows, very nice! What are their weights? Do you make
your own arrowheads? Your arrows look alot like mine. What twpe of
bow do you use? I am making some plains style arrow with obsidian heads.
These are shorter that the cane arrows. Well, until I hear from you
again...

David/Biaseka

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========483==================================================

Re: [bambooarrow] Re: Hi from Austria!

Sat, 21 Feb 2004 02:25:27 EST

[email protected]..



In a message dated 2/19/2004 8:10:58 PM Central Standard Time,
[email protected].. writes:
community.webshots.com/ph...2430YolANQ
Hey, this is Arthur. Beautiful work. An excellence to strive for!




++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========484==================================================

Re: Hi from Austria!

Sat, 21 Feb 2004 21:34:47 -0000

"guiltyrazors" <[email protected]..>



Hi David!
the weight range from 500gr to 750gr depends on the bamboo I use.
I have started knapping stone points some years ago,but my skill is
very limited,i got a couple of nice stone points from friends in the
USA and I have bought a few,too.(Steve Allely,Derek Mc Lean,...)
I just ordered 100 raw tonkin shafts from a dealer here in
Austria,they will arrive soon,hope some of them will work for good
arrow material,too.they were rather cheap ,just about $15 for the 100
raw shafts.
I also like making arrows from shoots like viburnum or dogwood that
also grows here..just look at my site and see more stuff I have done..
community.webshots.com/al...4624VvXaCR

I´m shooting a selfmade osage flatbow 61"long [email protected] backed with
cherrybark and with a linen string...here are some more pics:
community.webshots.com/al...4133pleZAX
my best selfbow so far...

May I an see some of your arrow and bow stuff too?
where are you actually from??
bye
charly
>
> Hi Charly,
>
> I viewed your arrows, very nice! What are their weights? Do you
make
> your own arrowheads? Your arrows look alot like mine. What twpe
of
> bow do you use? I am making some plains style arrow with
obsidian heads.
> These are shorter that the cane arrows. Well, until I hear from
you
> again...
>
> David/Biaseka

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========485==================================================

Re: [bambooarrow] Re: Hi from Austria!

Sat, 21 Feb 2004 15:43:22 -0800 (PST)

[email protected]..



> Hi David!
> the weight range from 500gr to 750gr depends on the bamboo I use.
> I have started knapping stone points some years ago,but my skill is
> very limited,i got a couple of nice stone points from friends in the
> USA and I have bought a few,too.(Steve Allely,Derek Mc Lean,...)
> I just ordered 100 raw tonkin shafts from a dealer here in
> Austria,they will arrive soon,hope some of them will work for good
> arrow material,too.they were rather cheap ,just about $15 for the 100
> raw shafts.
> I also like making arrows from shoots like viburnum or dogwood that
> also grows here..just look at my site and see more stuff I have done..
> community.webshots.com/al...4624VvXaCR
>
> I´m shooting a selfmade osage flatbow 61"long [email protected] backed with
> cherrybark and with a linen string...here are some more pics:
> community.webshots.com/al...4133pleZAX
> my best selfbow so far...
>
> May I an see some of your arrow and bow stuff too?
> where are you actually from??
> bye
> charly

Hi Charly,
When I can, I like to go into the wilds and collect my own arrow shafts,
However, I have been reading on Ishi and how he made arrows from birch
dowels! I find this interesting and am thinking on doing this myself!
So far I do not have any way to inter my things on the web, but hope to
soon! When I do I'll let you know. As I said earlier i am wirking on a
Plains arrow and possible bow. I am also looking at making an Apache
archery outfit! I also make my own points, Metal and flint and obsidian.
When I can I'll get pics and post them to you. I am working on a oak
bow. Look forward to hearing from you again.

David

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========486==================================================

New file uploaded to bambooarrow

9 Mar 2004 10:58:12 -0000

[email protected]




Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the bambooarrow
group.

File : /rivercane,bamboo,tonkin arrows/switchcane greygoose2small.jpg
Uploaded by : guiltyrazors <[email protected]..>
Description : details on nocks and cresting with primitive earth pigments,grey goose feathers sinew bound

You can access this file at the URL

groups.yahoo.com/group/ba...2small.jpg

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit

help.yahoo.com/help/us/groups/files

Regards,

guiltyrazors <[email protected]..>

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========487==================================================

Re: Questions for Interview What about the Do in Gung Do?

Fri, 12 Mar 2004 18:44:25 -0000

"jonathanwexler1" <[email protected]..>



I don't want to sound weird, which is hard for me since I am weird,
but what about a small section on the spirituality or philosophy of
the korean archer?

Each culture has a different way that their master archers
approach "the shot'.

In Zen and the Art of Archery we learned that hitting the mark was
not the goal.

With Ishi we learned that if the bow was not "right"...well it just
wasn't.

In Instinctive Shooting we heard that "aiming" wasn't necessary if
we learned to trust our natural Eye-hand coordination.

Yet others believe in a strictly technical stance-anchor and aim
method.

What do the Korean greats do? This might not be an easy section to
write, but might give the reader a feel for how archery is
approached in Korea.

I know that tradition is important and certain ritual norms are
followed. I assume these forms are meant to put the archer on the
path to the true shot.

Am I babbling?

Really looking forward to publication Thomas. Oh, also, a list of
suppliers worldwide might be nice. An accumulation of as many items
and suppliers as possible in an index is always nice in a book on a
highly focused subject.

Thanks, Jonathan

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========488==================================================

Re: Hi from Austria! Your arrows.

Fri, 12 Mar 2004 18:50:30 -0000

"jonathanwexler1" <[email protected]..>



I just want to say that I feel really good when I look at these
arrows.

It is rewarding to see such nice and personal work.

You must be very proud.

Jonathan

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========489==================================================

Re: Questions for Interview What about the Do in Gung Do?

Mon, 15 Mar 2004 04:43:10 -0000

"koreanarchery" <[email protected]..>



Thanks, Jonathan,

I'll certainly have a section on it. Korean trad archery isn't as
ceremonial as Japanese kyudo, but there are some parts about it that
might be thought as that.



T




--- In [email protected], "jonathanwexler1"
<[email protected]..> wrote:
> I don't want to sound weird, which is hard for me since I am
weird,
> but what about a small section on the spirituality or philosophy
of
> the korean archer?
>
> Each culture has a different way that their master archers
> approach "the shot'.
>
> In Zen and the Art of Archery we learned that hitting the mark was
> not the goal.
>
> With Ishi we learned that if the bow was not "right"...well it
just
> wasn't.
>
> In Instinctive Shooting we heard that "aiming" wasn't necessary if
> we learned to trust our natural Eye-hand coordination.
>
> Yet others believe in a strictly technical stance-anchor and aim
> method.
>
> What do the Korean greats do? This might not be an easy section to
> write, but might give the reader a feel for how archery is
> approached in Korea.
>
> I know that tradition is important and certain ritual norms are
> followed. I assume these forms are meant to put the archer on the
> path to the true shot.
>
> Am I babbling?
>
> Really looking forward to publication Thomas. Oh, also, a list of
> suppliers worldwide might be nice. An accumulation of as many
items
> and suppliers as possible in an index is always nice in a book on
a
> highly focused subject.
>
> Thanks, Jonathan

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========490==================================================

test

Mon, 05 Apr 2004 15:42:19 -0000

"jonathanwexler1" <[email protected]..>





++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========491==================================================

Temporary site set up

Mon, 05 Apr 2004 15:48:11 -0000

"jonathanwexler1" <[email protected]..>



Thomas has been locked out of all of his boards so he is unable to
post or administer them.

Please join us at pub227.ezboard.com/btraditionalarchery

You will find 4 groups posting there now, and we may all finally get
a chance to meet each other.

See you all at the new board.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========492==================================================

Temporary site for Bamboo arrow

Mon, 05 Apr 2004 15:29:17 -0000

"jonathanwexler1" <[email protected]..>



Thomas has been locked out from all of his websites. As a result he
can not administer or post to them. As a result he has set up a
temporary site for all of his groups.

This might also be a chance for you to meet some of us from other
groups :-)

Please join us at pub227.ezboard.com/btraditionalarchery

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

========493==================================================

Come on over the water's fine

Tue, 20 Apr 2004 17:41:12 -0000

"jonathanwexler1" <[email protected]..>



For those of you who have not signed up, I know it's a hassle but
you only have to do it once. If you do a GLOBAL sign up you can
access any bord there with the same password.

I miss your quick repartee.

Jonathan

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